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Glove Box


A glove box (or glovebox) creates a stable, sealed environment. Samples are transferred into the main chamber through an antechamber, and gloves enable you work within the glove box.

Our glove box is a complete benchtop system designed with affordability and simplicity in mind. Ideal for many inert atmosphere applications, from air sensitive experiments to handling hazardous materials and chemicals. With a comprehensive and versatile suite of integrated features, our glove box is built for every laboratory, including yours.

We also supply a range of replacement components, including gloves and sensors, to make system maintenance straightforward and easy. And if you need support, our glove box resources provide troubleshooting tips, application guidance, and maintenance advice.

Together, we offer everything you need to easily incorporate an effective Ossila glove box system into your laboratory set up.

Glove Boxes and Glove Box Components


Laboratory Glove Box

Laboratory Glove Box

Creates an ISO Class II inert atmosphere with an ultra-low leak rate. Affordable to buy and economical to run, with lower costs than larger systems. Equipped with monitoring software, multiple feedthroughs, independent antechamber sensor boards, and multiple purge options. The compact benchtop design is easily integrated into any workspace.

Price $9,938 ex. VAT
Glove Box Gloves

Glove Box Gloves

Pair of replacement gloves for our glove box or other models with an 8-inch port diameter. Constructed from butyl rubber, they are suitable for use in an inert atmosphere environment and with a range of chemicals. Designed to enable good manual dexterity at only 0.38mm thick.

Price $525 ex. VAT
Oxygen Sensor

Oxygen Sensor

Accurate and easy-to-fit replacement 4-pin oxygen sensor for our glove box. With a range of 0.5% to 25% and a resolution of 0.01%, these photoluminescent sensors reliably monitor the internal conditions of your glove box.

Price $250 ex. VAT
Glove Box Nitrile O-Rings

Glove Box Nitrile O-Rings

Replacement or spare O-rings for the glove port (pack of 4) and antechamber door (pack of 2). Each set is specifically sized to form a complete seal to maintain an inert atmosphere. Durable and easy to clean as part of a regular maintenance schedule.

From $14 ex. VAT

Glove Box Resources and Support


Buying Guides

Why Buy the Ossila Glove Box

It is important for you to understand the benefits and limitations of different glove box systems before making the investment.

If you are looking for a robust, easy-to-use glove box, the Ossila Laboratory Glove Box is the perfect choice for you. Unlike larger, more complex systems, our glove box offers a low cost, portable benchtop design, for a versatile range of inert atmosphere applications.

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Ossila glove box on a lab bench How to Choose a Glove Box

Choosing the right glove box for your needs is important. The system should be suitable for your samples, experimental requirements, laboratory environment, and budget.

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Glove Box Design Glove Box Design

A glove box includes a clear panel, which allows you to see the contents of the chamber, and gloves which allow you to manipulate it. Smaller, secondary chambers, called antechambers, allow you to add or remove items without exposing the inside of the glove box to the atmospheric conditions.

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Maintenance and Operation

Glove Box Standard Operating Procedure Glove Box Standard Operating Procedure

Working safely within a glove box requires the care and co-operation of everyone who uses it. For this reason, we recommend outlining a standard operating procedure for your laboratory.

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Glove Box installation Glove Box Installation

The Ossila Laboratory Glove Box is designed to be easy to install and maintain, and is suitable for most laboratories. Its small footprint and quick set up also means that it is relatively portable and can be conveniently transferred between labs as required.

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Replace glove box gloves How to Replace Glove Box Gloves

Glove box gloves must be flexible and relatively thin to allow movement within the main chamber. This will be the most vulnerable exposure point to air and moisture as small holes can easily occur here.

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Glove Box installation Outgassing Materials and Solvents

Materials processed within a glove box can directly impact the quality of the atmosphere and the ability of the system to maintain an inert atmosphere.

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Glove Box Maintenance and Troubleshooting

The Ossila Laboratory Glove Box uses automatic purging and programmable leak tests, making it easy to maintain an inert environment.

However, there are a number of steps that you as the glove box user can take to ensure that the inert atmosphere remains intact. These include performing regular cleaning and maintenance checks, following a standard operating procedure, using the antechamber correctly, and purging as required.

It is also important to be able to quickly identify, troubleshoot, and fix problems as they occur. Even if your glove box is properly maintained, leaks and other issues can occur during normal usage.

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Electrical feedthrough in the Ossila glove box Glove Box Feedthrough Assembly

Feedthrough points allow you to pass lines and cables from the external to the internal environment. There are several different ways to create the required feedthroughs in your glove box.

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Glove box antechamber Glove Box Antechamber

Antechambers are small, isolated compartments. They can be exposed to atmosphere more often than the main chamber as it will take them much less time to achieve inert conditions. You will use these to move small items in and out of your glove box.

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Ossila glove box control panel when completing a leak test Glove Box Leak Tests

If you suspect a leak, the first thing you should do is perform a leak test. Leak tests raise the glove box to an extreme positive or negative pressure and then measure the rate of change of pressure over a period of time.

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Glove Box Leaks Glove Box Leaks

Our glove boxes run at an overpressure, so if the leak is small, the glove box may still be able to maintain the integrity of the internal atmosphere. However, during this time, the glove box will use a much larger amount of inert gas than normal as the overpressure in the glove box will result in a flow of gas from the inside of the system to the outside.

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Theory and Applications

How to Make a Perovskites Solar Cells in a Glove Box

This video is a guide on how to make perovskite films when processed inside a nitrogen filled glove box. The resultant devices achieve efficiencies greater than 19% PCE.

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Glove Box Applications Glove Box Applications

A glove box is suitable for a variety of applications across the world of science and research. From organic electronics to additve manufacturing, the inert atmosphere provided by a glove box is critical in many settings.

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Glove Box Perovskite Solar Cell Case Study Glove Box Perovskite Solar Cell Case Study

The highest performing perovskite solar cells were all made in glove boxes. This case study to investigate how inert does an environment need to be for a given process and is the Ossila Laboratory Glove Box effective.

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How to Make a Perovskites Solar Cells in A Glove Box Solar Cell Encapsulation in a Glove Box

Film and device encapsulation involves applying thin protective layers onto the surface of your electronic devices. Encapsulating your devices inside a glove box environment limits their exposure to contaminants

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Inert Gases Inert Gases

Inert gases are gases which are chemically inactive, so will not undergo chemical reactions with many materials. Inert gases are used for many purposes in a wide range of industries - for example in welding, chemical processing, and as filler gases in light sources.

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Defining Moisture Content in a Glove Box

Controlling the moisture content present in a glove box serves several important purposes. First, it helps maintain a stable environment for sensitive experiments. Second, it prevents moisture-sensitive materials from degrading in the workspace. Lastly, it can improve the accuracy and reliability of your results.

There are multiple ways of defining how much moisture is present in the air. With clear definitions, guidance on converting values, and a simple conversion table, you will easily be able to work with any of the available definitions to control the moisture content in your glove box environment.

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Argon vs Nitrogen for Glove Box Argon vs Nitrogen for Glove Box

Argon and nitrogen are both unreactive gases which can be used to create an inert environment within a glove box. Both gases will efficiently displace air within a confined space, are easy to store and will not react with most materials. Therefore, both N2 and Ar can create a glove box environment with very low moisture and oxygen levels.

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Positive pressure glove box with gloves inflated Glove Box Pressure: Positive or Negative?

Glove boxes can be maintained at positive pressure or negative pressure. Both create atmospheres separate from ambient, keeping a barrier between your materials and the external lab environment.

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Using Ossila Laboratory Glove Box to handle materials Air Sensitive Compounds

Some materials can degrade or decompose over time due to exposure to oxygen or moisture. This can be accelerated by exposure to light or increased temperatures. Other materials can absorb moisture from the air causing them to aggregate.

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Ossila Laboratory Glove Box in a laboratory Air Free Techniques

Air free techniques are essential for the handling and storage of materials that are unstable when exposed to air. Compounds are defined as unstable if they react with an element in air, often moisture or oxygen.

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